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Palantir.net's Guide to Digital Governance: Properties and Platforms

This is the second installment of Palantir.net’s Guide to Digital Governance, a comprehensive guide intended to help get you started when developing a governance plan for your institution’s digital communications.

Having started at the 10,000ft view to assess the digital ecosystem for our governance planning, part two of the Guide to Digital Governance begins to identify the specific properties and platforms you will need to consider within that ecosystem.

Taking the top level categories you listed for your governance plan in part one, you now will want to think of the properties and platforms within each of them. The following questions are intended to help you think through each piece carefully.

Public Websites

  • What are the websites we own that are visible to anyone on the Web?
  • Do we have any public subdomain Websites, such as subdomain.mywebsite.com?
  • Do we have any micro-sites, or Websites with a URL that is different from our main site?
  • Do we have any blogs that may be hosted elsewhere, but would be considered part of our public Web presence?


Private Websites

  • What are the Websites we own that are visible to only those with access we control?
  • What are the Websites we own that are visible to only those who have access through machines running on our organization’s network?
  • Do we have any subdomain Websites, such as subdomain.mywebsite.com that require logging in?
  • Do we have any Websites for only a specific set of constituents?


Intranets and Portals

  • Do we have a network of internal-use Websites (a.k.a an Intranet), accessible only by password or by logging on to the organization’s network, or otherwise hidden (even by obscurity)?
  • Do we use any portal sites or pages as a means of aggregating links of importance for specific groups of users?


Web-Based Applications

  • Are there any web-based applications we use to perform specialized tasks, such as generating reports from data in a database or retrieving digital assets from a database?
  • Are there any online tools that we use (whether built internally or purchased from a third-party vendor as software-as-a-service (SaaS)?


E-Commerce

  • What platforms, systems, and/or services do we use for collecting payments online?
  • What platforms, systems, and/or services do we use for selling products online?
  • Where are these located relative to our other Websites?


Social Networks

  • What are the social media networks we use to communicate to the outside world?


Digital Media

  • What are the platforms we use to create digital media, such as video, audio, and photography?
  • What are the platforms we use to distribute digital media, such as video, audio, and photography


Broadcast Email

  • What are the systems we use to send broadcast email to all or large segments of our internal group, members, staff, community, etc.?
  • What are the systems we use to send broadcast email to all or large segments of our external community, clients, constituents, etc. for the purposed of marketing and promotion?


Digital Communications Governance

  • What are the pieces that will constitute our official governance system?
  • NOTE: You may not know the answer to this one yet, so leave it empty for now.

 

This post is part of a larger series of posts, which make up a Guide to Digital Governance Planning. The sections follow a specific order intended to help you start at a high-level of thinking and then focus on greater and greater levels of detail. The sections of the guide are as follows:

  1. Starting at the 10,000ft View – Define the digital ecosystem your governance planning will encompass.
  2. Properties and Platforms – Define all the sites, applications and tools that live in your digital ecosystem.
  3. Ownership – Consider who ultimately owns and is responsible for each site, application and tool.
  4. Intended Use – Establish the fundamental purpose for the use of each site, application and tool.
  5. Roles and Permissions – Define who should be able to do what in each system.
  6. Content – Understand how ownership and permissions should apply to content.
  7. Organization – Establish how the content in your digital properties should be organized and structured.
  8. URL Naming Conventions – Define how URL patterns should be structured in your websites.
  9. Design – Determine who owns and is responsible for the many aspects design plays in digital communications and properties.
  10. Personal Websites – Consider the relationship your organization should have with personal websites of members of your organization.
  11. Private Websites, Intranets and Portals – Determine the policies that should govern site which are not available to the public.
  12. Web-Based Applications – Consider use and ownership of web-based tools and applications.
  13. E-Commerce – Determine the role of e-commerce in your website.
  14. Broadcast Email – Establish guidelines for the use of broadcast email to constituents and customers.
  15. Social Media – Set standards for the establishment and use of social media tools within the organization.
  16. Digital Communications Governance – Keep the guidelines you create updated and relevant.